Restoring a Stanley #10 – Part 1

Here is my Stanley #10 which was part of the batch of tool I purchased from a collector early last year (the same one I bought Big Bertha from). He sold it to me as a discounted price due to its poor condition: it was covered in rust, the tote was broken, and the mouth had obviously been chipped and badly refiled. I did not have time to deal with most of the issues when I purchased it but did nuke the rust on the blade, chip breaker, and cap-leaver. I’m apparently bad at before pictures so here is the plane as it looked on Friday:

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Most of the Japaning was missing or loose and there was rust all over the plane body. Since I already had the electrolysis gear out for the vise the frog and the body went into the bath for a long soak. 6 hours later I hit them with a brass brush and then back into the bath for several more hours (I’m not sure if my sacrificial iron is getting used up or if it’s because I am using Washing Soda instead of my usual baking soda but the rust removal went much slower this weekend).  After the last soak I used a “between finishes” sanding pad to remove the black residue left on the parts and placed them into a 225 degree oven for 10 minutes, letting them cool inside the oven; this fully dries out the parts in preparation for painting. Once the parts had cooled down there was a fair amount of flash rust that I removed with a wire brush mounted to a Dremmel Multi-tool (I don’t have a bench grinder yet).

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For applying the new finish, I followed Rex Mill’s plan using engine paint with the addition of petroleum jelly on the areas where paint is not needed, as recommended by Bob Jones.

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Before                                After Flash Rust Removal                                 After Painting

Tonight I will wipe/scrape/sand off the excess paint and access the straightness of the plane mouth.

I also started repairing the broken tote. It’s not a clean break and it had a previous railed repair so I decided to use a compilation of the techniques found on Rex Mill’s site. First I scrapped out as much of the excess glue that I could, and then I drilled a series of small holes in each face of the break (the theory being that this would give more surface area for the epoxy. A quarter inch dowel rapped in tape and coated with petroleum jelly lined up the two parts and I smeared 5 minute epoxy into the holes on each face, squished the two parts together with my fingers, and added a bead of epoxy on the outside to fill the chips/gaps along the break. Once the epoxy was 90% set up I pulled out the dowel and continued to hold the pieces together until the bead was hard to the touch.

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I forgot to take a picture of the glued up tote but I will make sure to do so before I sand it down.

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