Grinding and Table Work

I’m not doing a great job of taking in progress pictures but I made some progress this weekend.  As I have mentioned before, simple tasks seem to grow as related tasks pile up.

Last weekend my DrawSharp arrived from BenchCrafted and when I attempted to assemble it, I discovered that the wear plate was missing and BenchCrafted immediately sent me a replacement.  On Friday I finally assembled it and realized i needed to grind my drawknife.  So out came my grinder but the handles required me to hold the knife at an angle to the stone so I used by early used high grit stone which ended up with a bevel at the outer edge.

Since I had the grinder out I pulled out ever bench plane that needed a new edge and ended up grinding the blades for me #4 and #7, both of which had chips.  I also pulled out my #5 1/2 which has been sitting waiting for some TLC (some of the parts went through electrolysis when I first squired it).  While I had it out I refinished the rear tote, swapped out the front tote, removed some rust, and oiled everything.  I had planned to re-paint it since it was missing almost all of its jappaning but oil wil work.


Then I decided to flatten the bottom of my #4 on some sand paper followed by diamond plate and water stone.


Now I was finally able sharpen my draw knife which I used to remove a lot of the material from the bottom relief.  This was followed by a scrub plane, my spindle sander, and a chisel to flatten it up.


The bridle joint took me forever and I’m still not happy with it.  I remembered to smooth the sides of the legs before marking out the joint.


It still needs some adjusting but I’m hoping to get one side together this week.

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Harvey Ellis Saw Till – Part 6 – Assembly Begins

Last night I started the assembly process of the saw till so the primary focus was on getting the joinery tight on the bottom half of the case. After some test fitting I identified some dovetails and through tenons that did not close fully and that the back panel in the drawer compartment was not sitting square with the sides. First I squared up the tenons on the back panel and undercut the shoulders slightly with my shoulder plane until I got a tight fit.

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Next it was time to tackle the dovetails and through tenons. A quick diagnosis with a square showed that a few areas had not been undercut properly. A small sharp chisel made quick work of this and solved the problem.

Notice the middle is higher than the edge.
Notice the middle is higher than the edge.
Both edges are the high points.
Both edges are the high points.

Because the through tenons are going to stand proud of the sides, I needed to plane the sides to their final finish. I sharpened up the blade in my #4 (it’s amazing how long a PMV-11 blade will hold a usable edge but finish planning pine needs a sharp blade) and after a couple of test cuts realized that my sole was not quite flat any more. I used my diamond plates to flatten it up a bit for now but I probably need to spend and day flattening my soles.

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Nice fluffy shavings
Nice fluffy shavings

Next it was time to make a glue block by chopping out space for the pins (I saw this on the Woodwright shop), it is important to bevel the edges of the cut out to avoid leaving hard imprint edges on the sides.

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A bit of liquid hide glue and I called it a night.

Nice and tight.
Nice and tight.
As I mentioned, I need more clamps.
As I mentioned, I need more clamps.